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2011 Print

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Public Service
First Place
Craig R. McCoy, Nancy Phillips, Dylan Purcell
Philadelphia Inquirer
“In Search of Justice”
Judge’s Comments: The effect of this wide-ranging work, which exposed outrage upon outrage, appears to have brought about stunning reform in Philadelphia’s criminal-justice system. This is high-impact public service journalism of the highest caliber.
Second Place
Isaiah Thompson
Philadelphia City Paper
“The Fall Guy”
Judge’s Comments: A fight. Some kids. A rush to judgment. This journalist gave voice to a powerless teen whose life could have been changed forever over an unfair decision. One of the media’s most important service roles is to right wrongs and stick up for the most vulnerable among us. This journalism did just that.
Third Place
Cynthia Ryan
CR Magazine
“Homeless with Cancer”
Judge’s Comments: An interesting look at a powerless population, the homeless. It humanizes what must be a terrifying diagnosis to someone with no money for a home, let alone health care.
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Investigative Reporting
First Place
Wendy Ruderman
Philadelphia Daily News
“Peril on the Pipes”
Judge’s Comments: A compelling narrative that surely led many residents inside–and outside — the PHA to examine that “stuff” covering their pipes. This is difference-making journalism, populated with real people–and results. The last piece about a former worker’s lung transplant was a nice bookend to a series that not only did a terrific job of clearly explaining the hazards of asbestos but also illustrated the personal toll and a pattern of cover-up by a government agency.

Second Place
Martha Woodall and William K. Marimow
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Philadelphia School District–No-bid Contract”
Judge’s Comments: This series deftly handled the murky world of contract bids. It’s a complicated topic, but these reporters connected the dots and got demonstrable results after shining a light on this shadowy subject. Readers respond to pocketbook issues, and school spending could hardly be a more relevant topic.

Third Place
Jason Fagone
Philadelphia magazine
“The Man Who Duped City Hall”
Judge’s Comments: Fagone teases out a fascinating-to-read, meticulously detailed tale here. The amount of money is staggering and the lack of accountability stunning. Unabashed, the main character seems well on his way to his next scheme. This reader is left with an irresistible urge to read the next chapter of this “book.” Some of the writer’s opinions sprinkled throughout were a little jarring, but I anticipate that this must be the style of this publication.

Ongoing News Coverage (circ. more than75,000)
First Place
Staff
Philadelphia Inquirer
“PHA chief under fire”
Judge’s Comments: In unraveling this outrageous story of the alleged misdeeds of the head of the Philadelphia Housing Authority, the Inquirer performed a most vital public service: holding the powerful accountable. The detail-rich articles included in the entry paint a picture of a news organization on a roll, uncovering questionable action after questionable action, and generally staying ahead on this competitive story. The results of the paper’s reporting (namely his resignation) speak for themselves.
Second Place
Catherine Lucey, Barbara Laker, Wendy Ruderman
Philadelphia Daily News
“PHA”
Judge’s Comments: Another strong entry on the scandal involving the head of the
Philadelphia Housing Authority. Besides apparently breaking some aspects of this competitive story, these reporters were excellent story tellers. The way they told these stories engaged this reader–particularly on the outrage factor.
Third Place
David Gambacorta, Dana DiFilippo, Natalie Pompilio
Philadelphia Daily News
Abortion Clinic
Judge’s Comments: Particularly striking in these solid stories was the staff’s ability to draw stories from what must have been reluctant sources: abortion patients

Ongoing News Coverage (circ. Less than 75,000)
First Place
Rose Quinn and Staff
Delaware County Daily Times
“Tragedy in Norwood”
Judge’s Comments: This tragedy was told very completely and sensitively by the journalists at the Delaware County Daily Times. The fact that the paper eventually spoke to and told the story of the third girl, the one who witnessed but didn’t go through with the suicide, shows that it gained the trust of the three families. The pieces about suicide prevention nicely rounded out the coverage.
Second Place
Jeremy Rosen
Courier-Post
“Medford chief steps down”
Judge’s Comments: What a story: A police chief caught in a lie, a Cheesesteak King and a Harley! This series not only turned up impropriety after impropriety but brought results, namely the resignation of the police chief. It’s not easy to take on community leaders, especially police departments, but this reporter was persistent, courageous in the face of pressure and denials and, most important of all, he was right.
Third Place
Katrina Dix, Chris Barber, Fran Maye
Daily Local News of West Chester
“Last rides”
Judge’s Comments: A well-told and heart-breaking story of the consequences of a split-second lapse in judgment by a teenage driver.

Deadline or Spot News Story (circ. more than 75,000)
First Place
Staff
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Two passengers missing after crash on Delaware”
Judge’s Comments: The Inquirer staff did a nice job surrounding this story and delivering a very complete report on deadline. The witness accounts were particularly good. The addition of the graphic was helpful in understanding the disaster. Also, the sidebar on the regulation of these floating tourist attractions was an excellent addition for the morning after. It showed quick thinking on the part of editors arranging coverage.
Second Place
David Gambacorta
Philadelphia Daily News
“Rampage at Kraft”
Judge’s Comments: Excellent detail for such a late-breaking story. It’s a pretty complete report considering deadline constraints. Nice “get” on the witness accounts from inside the building.
Third Place
Jan Ransom
Philadelphia Daily News
“Death of a Dream”
Judge’s Comments: These kinds of stories are far too commonplace. unfortunately, yet this reporter managed to draw some nice details about the slain girl so that the reader had a chance to “know” her a little.

Deadline or Spot News Story (circ. less than 75,000)
First Place
Ben Finley
Bucks County Courier Times
“Boy, 5, killed by truck on Route 13”
Judge’s Comments: A remarkably complete first-day account of a tragic afternoon. The
detail, not only from witnesses but also what the reporter observed at the
scene, is unusually detailed and vivid. The description of the boy’s hysterical
brother, especially, has stuck with this judge. An impressive amount of
reporting on a tight deadline.
Second Place
Bryan Schwartzman
Jewish Exponent
“Cemetery ad stirs up stinging controversy”
Judge’s Comments: A very informative story that explores all sides of this issue well.
Particularly helpful to the reader is the fact that the reporter sought many
different opinions on Jewish tradition, law and practice. A well-balanced look
at this controversy.
Third Place
Cindy Scharr, Vicky Thomas, Paul Luce
Delaware County Daily and Sunday Times
“Tragedy in Norwood: Two teens killed by train”

Magazine Story
First Place
John Shiffman
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Shadow War: An Elite Philadelphia Squad’s Secret Mission Against Iran”
Judge’s Comments: Every installment of this exhaustively sourced series about a sting operation against an arms broker, crackles with tension, release, wit and clarity. Tremendous job of breaking down the breathtaking complexities involved in staunching the flow of U.S. weapons technology to the bad guys. So much detail, so many players – and yet the pace never slows. The cliffhanger endings each day pull the reader toward the saga’s fascinating close. The main characters are nicely drawn, their dialogue exquisitely chosen. Compliments, also, to the writer of the smart daily setups called “The story so far.”
Second Place
Ralph Cipriano
Philadelphia Magazine
“The Hit Man”
Judge’s Comments: The story grabs readers from its opening sentence. Then, in zippy style, it tugs them into the amazing saga of a brutal mobster from Philadelphia who wound up in the federal witness protection program, only to leave in a huff. The savagery of his rise in the neighborhood gang, the events that led to his turning federal witness, the battle for his life against two hit men – all together it’s like reading an action novel. This is no glorification of a murderer; it is a lavishly sourced study of how one person can fall into a life of crime, escape it, have redemption snatched away and, strangely, abandon his quest for revenge.
Third Place
Mari A. Schaefer, Maria Panaritis, Joelle Farrell
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Anatomy of a Teen Tragedy”
Judge’s Comments: This special report brilliantly uses social media to document the mindset of a trio of troubled teens, two of whom committed suicide. Their electronic texting forms a shared diary. The report’s narrative elements pop with drama, and interviewees’ quotes deftly capture the community’s anguish and confusion. The reporting and detail are first rate.

Non-deadline Writing (circ. More than 75,000)
First Place
Craig LaBan
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Master of Cuisine, Slave of Washington”
Judge’s Comments: A fantastically interesting and unique peek into the past. The
beautiful story-telling and writing really brought this tale to life.
Second Place
Alfred Lubrano
Philadelphia Inquirer
“A portrait of hunger”
Third Place
Paul Nussbaum
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Fast track: Is America ready for high-speed rail?”
Judge’s Comments: Really nice job taking a complicated topic and bringing it home on a
relevant and interesting level. I’ve read a lot on high-speed rail, and usually
articles are focused on the high cost or the politics or on this program or
that. But this article does a masterful job of explaining the potential benefits
of high-speed rail to the passengers, including a nice description at how it
works elsewhere.

Non-deadline Writing (circ. 40,000-75,000)
First Place
Laurie Mason Schroeder
Bucks County Courier Times
“Unlocking the Children & Youth Agency”
Judge’s Comments: By observing court proceedings and caseworker visits that are typically not open to the public, Laurie Mason Schroeder brings unprecedented transparency to the Bucks County Children and Youth agency. She uncovers humanity in bureaucracy by revealing how a judge strives to put children first, how caseworkers put themselves in unknown and potentially dangerous situations, and how families unite and dissolve. Her storytelling brings this agency–and the families and children it serves—into the light.
Second Place
Jenny Song
CR magazine
“Three stories on the personal side of cancer: The Measure of a Life; Too Scared to Not Get a Mammogram?; Stepping Up”
Judge’s Comments: Jenny Song has written three eloquent and moving pieces about the personal side of cancer. She reveals the fears and struggles of a patient and a caregiver, while also uncovering the ways they have used the disease as an impetus for positive action.
Third Place
Ben Finley
Bucks County Courier Times
“Couple’s car scam runs out of gas”
Judge’s Comments: Ben Finley’s story about a couple’s car-selling scam is a gripping, cautionary tale. Through court documents and interviews with a victim, law enforcement officials and the convicted con artist, Finley reveals in great detail how the couple pulled it off, and how they ultimately got caught. Finley’s story reads like a plot out of a crime TV show, better only because it’s true.

Non-deadline Writing (circ. Less than 40,000)
First Place
John George
Philadelphia Business Journal
“Road to Reform” series
Judge’s Comments: This series does a nice job of explaining how complicated national health-care reform will affect local business, employees and patients. The stories are presented in easy-to-understand terms, and the use of local people to illustrate each issue is effective.
Second Place
Carin M. Smilk
Jewish Exponent
“Islamophobia? Not in this quiet neighborhood”
Judge’s Comments: A very interesting look at relationships forged among the Jewish and Islamic residents of a special neighborhood. The nice detail of how it unfolded provides a roadmap of how others could achieve harmony as well.
Third Place
Fredda Sacharow
Jewish Exponent
“From a chaotic life to a new one of familiar order”
Judge’s Comments: Just a nice, uplifting feature of a woman overcoming life challenges with the help of a Jewish family. Readers enjoy such heartwarming tales among all the gloom and doom of breaking news.

Local Column
First Place
Daniel Rubin
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: These columns show a terrific knack for getting out of the way of the story and letting it tell itself.
Second Place
Bill White
The Morning Call
Judge’s Comments: The columns make thought-provoking topics into great reads by staying succinct, punchy and relevant.
Third Place
Ronnie Polaneczky
Philadelphia Daily News
Judge’s Comments: These pieces do such a good job of taking interesting people and making a reader feel as though he’s in the room with them.

Business Story
First Place
Bob Fernandez
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Hershey School and Trust” coverage
Judge’s Comments: The Inquirer’s aggressive coverage of the Hershey Co., Hershey Trust and its activities raised important questions about the management of an influential, private institution with a high profile but little preference for public disclosure. The stories focusing on land deals, including one in which Hershey appeared to overpay for a golf course that benefited the then-CEO and veered from the Trust’s mission, were sharp and fair. They also had immediate impact, drawing scrutiny from the state attorney general’s office.
Second Place
Maria Panaritis
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Surviving the Storm
Judge’s Comments: Sometimes, it takes time to tell a great story, and this idea flourished in the Inquirer’s creative three-part tale of the life and death of an auto dealership. The series brought insight and pathos to a subject most people never quite consider: what it’s really like to run an auto dealership, and what it’s like to lose one when the carmaker on the nameplate goes bankrupt. Despite being published after the fact, there was a timeliness to the article, and timelessness, enough detail to keep the reader engaged.
Third Place
Tom Cowell
Philadelphia Weekly
“Last Call”
Judge’s Comments: It’s a perennial question: Why are Pennsylvania’s liquor laws so quirky? The Philadelphia Weekly attacks the issue with gusto, using equal parts reporting and attitude to stir up some outrage. By focusing on a new twist, wine vending machines, and appropriately shredding the idea to bits, the story makes for delightful and worthy reading.

Health and Science Story
First Place
Michael Vitez
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Inside the health-care crucible”
Judge’s Comments: The well-reported, exceptionally complete stories of this series
explore many of the toughest issues in hospitals today: Palliative care,
hospital-acquired infections, patient dumping, premature babies and other
high-cost, high-controversy issues. Vitez’s method of telling of each of these
issues through the story of one patient at one hospital is extremely effective.
His personalization of these issues also illustrates the gray areas where there
are no easy answers to the life-and-death issues that face families with their
loved ones.
Second Place
Sue Rochman
CR magazine
“The culture and cancer of rural poverty”
Third Place
Tara Murtha
Philadelphia Weekly
“Weight of the World”

Political Writing
First Place
Thomas Fitzgerald
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: This profile of an iconic Pennsylvania political figure, former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, ably captures the subject’s personality as well as his political impact. Fitzgerald brings strong authority and POV to the piece, but is fair-minded and objective in his observations. He does a terrific job of using an aspect of Specter’s personality—combativeness—as a theme to walk the reader through all the ups and downs of Specter’s life and political career. There’s a certain sadness to Specter and a sense of dismay about his political fortunes after such a long career, and Fitzgerald brings that home with subtle skill.
Second Place
John Baer
Philadelphia Daily News
“Guv plus blondes equals rumors, and it’s all his fault”
Judge’s Comments: Baer pulls no punches in this column about former Gov. Ed Rendell’s public associations with women who are not his wife. There’s a refreshing forcefulness to the column, and Baer makes a strong case against Rendell’s behavior without throwing any cheap shots or making unsubstantiated insinuations. Plus, it’s funny.
Third Place
Holly Otterbein
Philadelphia City Paper
“And stay out: A Cambodian refugee faces deportation after 24 years in the U.S.”
Judge’s Comments: Otterbein brings warmth and compassion to the plight of Mout Iv, a Philly man who came to the United States from Cambodia at age 9, grew up in America, made a life for himself and his family, but now has the misfortune of being targeted for deportation because of a crime he committed long ago. Otterbein does a nice job of fleshing Iv out as a person and putting Iv’s plight in context. Left unanswered are some legitimate questions about the legal morass facing former refugees and other immigrants who run afoul of the law.

Sports Story (circ. more than 75,000)
First Place
Ashley Fox, Mike Jensen
Philadelphia Inquirer
“The Deciders”
Judge’s Comments: Ambitious, exhaustive, thorough, insightful. Fascinating portraits of the characters who run the Eagles. But more than merely profiles of these football powerbrokers, each piece dug into their psyches and revealed their human sides. Also very well written with strong narrative technique.
Second Place
Richard Rys
Philadelphia Magazine
“Game On”
Judge’s Comments: A lively look at the inner-workings of Philadelphia sports radio and the flawed but fascinating character Mike Missanelli.
Third Place
Sports Staff
Philadelphia Daily News
“Doctor No”
Judge’s Comments: Impressive deadline coverage of an historic playoff game performance. Ten stories provided a cinematic view of Roy Halladay’s no-hitter.

Sports Story (circ. below 75,000)
First Place
Chris English
Bucks County Courier Times
“The Comeback Kid”
Judge’s Comments: The writer handles a delicate subject deftly and with care, taking the reader from the grisly beginning to overcoming that potential tragedy.
Second Place
Bryan Davis, Dave Zeitlin, Neil Geoghegan and Nate Heckenberger
Daily Local News of West Chester
“Quarterback Country”
Judge’s Comments: An ambitious collection of the stable of talented quarterbacks coming from the area, from those succeeding in the NFL to the next crop. There’s certainly something in the water there that inspires the residents to reach higher, as this project demonstrates.
Third Place
Allison Kaplan Sommer
Jewish Exponent
“Her Life in the Fast Lane as a Professional Ball Player“
Judge’s Comments: Nice feature, well executed.

Sports Column (circ. more than 75,000)
First Place
Bill Conlin
Philadelphia Daily News
Judge’s Comments: Conlin’s columns glisten with a sense of enterprise and solid reporting. He tells stories. He reports. Stylish writing, but no gimmicks. He’s concise, cogent and compelling. Column on Dickie Noles was a smart and engaging way of getting at a underlying problem in professional sports.
Second Place
Sam Donnellon
Philadelphia Daily News
Judge’s Comments: Good storyteller with cogent opinions. Especially liked the Vonn piece—a provocative angle and one that many can relate to. His piece on Fran Crippen and the world he left behind was touching without being overly emotional.
Third Place
Phil Sheridan
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: A craftsman, who builds a strong column. Muhammad piece was well told and poignant. Lurie-Vick column hit hard. His writing is sharp and taut. Good reads.

Sports Column (circ. less than 75,000)
First Place
Dave Zeitlin
Daily Local News of West Chester
Judge’s Comments: Most impressive are the subjects Zeitlin chooses to focus on in his column: human, real, compelling. Their stories are smartly told in well-reported columns with vivid narrative and stylish writing.
Second Place
Tom Tatum
Daily Local News of West Chester
Judge’s Comments: Tatum brings a lively touch to his outdoors column, taking it beyond the what fish are biting or best tips for bagging deer. He takes us along on his adventures, and we enjoy it, whether we ever plan to go there ourselves or not.
Third Place
Jeff McCaffery
Delaware County Daily Times
Judge’s Comments: McCaffery has strong opinions and he presents a solid case to defend them. His pieces are well-crafted and lively and thoughtful.

Editorial Writing
First Place
Guy Petroziello
Bucks County Courier Times
Judge’s Comments: Rigorous thinking, crisp writing, fearless truth-telling. And fun to read! Everybody needs a good Editorial page, and it appears the readers of Bucks County have one.
Second Place
Carol Towarnicky
Philadelphia Daily News
Judge’s Comments: Brisk pacing, irreverent but not off-puttingly disrespectful. You can read a lot of editorials and never encounter a sentence as enjoyable as: “It’s time the so-called representatives of the people actually took their side on something.”

Third Place
Josh Gohlke
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: Reading Gohlke’s entries, we felt as if he were taking us on three enjoyable walks. We reached intriguing destinations, but sampled nifty diversions along the way. Not every writer has this wry an eye. If only all of us did.
Lisa Hostein
Jewish Exponent
Judge’s Comments: Serious topics, seriously evaluated, yet presented in reader-friendly prose. Writing for a specialized audience, Hostein’s explanations of inside baseball welcome anyone willing to learn about these significant issues.
Editorial Columns
First Place
Harold Jackson
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: Harold Jackson’s columns reflect the polish of an accomplished writer and the energy of a fresh voice reaching for new ways to tell great yarns. We wanted to read more.
Second Place
Christine Flowers
Philadelphia Daily News
Judge’s Comments: This is a fine example of the punchy writing that makes daily newspapers a joy for so many readers. Christine Flowers exhibits a get-to-the-point style that refreshes. We suspect that her followers have the same reaction we did: Sitting next to her at the block party would be great fun.
Third Place
Trudy Rubin
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: Trudy Rubin is a fine story-teller. We felt as though we were bouncing alongside her as she traveled through Iraq. Her readers must enjoy how she weaves new reportage into the context of her earlier work in Iraq.

Editorial Cartoon
First Place
Tony Auth
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: Tony Auth shows a depth and command of the issues and illustrates his unmistakable opinion in a direct, seamless manner. In short, his are the exact way an editorial cartoon should be done.
Second Place
Tom Stiglich
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: The work of Tom Stiglich jumps off of the page. In an era of soft and far too subtle work by many cartoonists, Stiglich hearkens back to a day of hard hitting opinion and graphically powerful images.

Criticism
First Place
Howard Shapiro
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: Howard Shapiro’s theater criticism takes readers beyond a superficial evaluation of the performances and into the realm of what theater should be–an emotional connection between the audience and the artists. His work leaves no doubt that he is enamoured of this subject. He explores the goals of the productions and whether those goals were met. Shapiro’s writing is concise, personal and conversational. His voice is clear, never leaving the reader to wonder what to expect from the productions.
Second Place
Adam Erace
Philadelphia City Paper
Judge’s Comments: Adam Erace’s work immerses readers in the sights and smells of the restaurants he reviews. His vivid commentary makes the reader a partner at his table, and he clearly understands the complexities of the culinary world.
Third Place
Inga Saffron
Philadelphia Inquirer
Judge’s Comments: Inga Saffron’s writing lovingly explores the relationship between a city’s people and its architecture, examining both the structural appeal and the utility of the works. Her piece Schuylkill Park illustrates how the intersection of citizens’ interests and business interests can have a deleterious effect on one city landmark.

News Headlines
First Place
Kevin Bevan
Philadelphia Daily News
“Pulpit fiction,” “World War Tow,” “Cabin Pressure”
Judge’s Comments: Mr. Bevan exhibits the rare gift of capturing not only the subject but also the flavor of a story in just two or three words. Three delightful headlines.
Second Place
Dave Schmidt
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Home’s buyers can’t live with the meth left behind,” “Sun day worship brings out the masses,” “Roots, roots, roots from a home team”
Judge’s Comments: Mr. Schmidt has fun with the English language without losing sight of the first order of business: Communication.
Third Place
Steve Elliott
Philadelphia Inquirer
“The Garden State’s faulty basil,” “Here’s why we’re toast,” “Danza says class act isn’t just for show”
Judge’s Comments: A great selection of headlines that welcomed readers to the page and urged them to read on.

Feature Headlines
First Place
Janice Ward
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Layers take the cake,” “Colbert to salute Iraqi troopiness,” “Eat, Pray, Love and don’t forget Buy”
Judge’s Comments: Ms. Ward nicely adopts the appropriate tone on three varied stories, and then executes each delightfully. Iraqi troopiness? Hilarious. Eat, pray, love, buy? Exactly.
Second Place
Ed Weiner
Philadelphia Daily News
“Eats meets west,” “Hey, this is no yolk!” “Once an ‘I,’ now he’s a ‘oui’ ”
Sports Headline
First Place
Philip E. Heron
Delaware County Daily Times
Second Place
Drew McQuade
Philadelphia Daily News
Third Place
Doug Darroch
Philadelphia Daily News

Page Design
First Place
John Sherlock
Philadelphia Daily News
“America’s guilty pleasures,” “Top dog,” “You got fleeced”
Judge’s Comments: Fun and energetic tabloid covers grab the reader’s attention. Nice typography, snappy headlines.
Second Place
Bob Carville
Daily Local News of Westchester
“The Message,” “Katrina,” “Last rides”
Judge’s Comments: A variety of visual approaches nicely applied to different kinds of news.
Third Place
Morgaine Ford-Workman
Bucks County Courier Times
“A month at the farmer’s markets,” “Christina finds her voice,” “Berry early”
Judge’s Comments: Energetic visual solutions incorporating useful information important to the stories.

News Graphic
First Place
Jon Snyder
Philadelphia Daily News
“Wall-to-wall Philly”
Judge’s Comments: Useful map with fun touches, clean design, good layering of information.
Second Place
Morgaine Ford-Workman
Bucks County Courier Times
“Going green at home”
Judge’s Comments: Photo illustration cutaway nicely shows all the ways to go green at home.
Third Place
Amy Raudenbush
Philadelphia Daily News
“10-10-10”
Judge’s Comments: Fun factoids paired with fun spot illustrations. Givers readers good water-cooler fodder.

News photo
First Place
April Bartholomew
The Morning Call
“Anguish on a city street”
Judge’s Comments: The image of the brother kneeling over his sibling, just hit by a car, puts you right at the scene—and links you to the raw emotion of the older brother in a vivid, haunting way.
Second Place
Art Gentile
The Intelligencer
“Consoling grief”
Judge’s Comments: A beautifully composed tableau of family, grief and connection.
Third Place
Rich Kennedy
The Intelligencer
“Cooling off”
Judge’s Comments: Although this feels a bit feature-y, the image of the portly firefighter taking a break in the midst of 4-alarm chaos was worthy of note.

Feature Photo
First Place
Amy Dagroo
Daily Local News of West Chester
“Summertime playtime”
Judge’s Comments: Timeless summer fun, innocent and well-composed.
Second Place
Steven M Falk
Philadelphia Daily News
“Taze me out to the ballgame”
Judge’s Comments: The security guard in hot pursuit of a fan made us all laugh out loud..
Third Place
Rick Kintzel
The Intelligencer
“Peeking through”
Judge’s Comments: Works graphically, with the foot as a visual punch line.

Sports Photo
First Place
Tom Kelly IV
Daily Local News of Westchester
“Extra time, extra magic”
Judge’s Comments: The exuberance and joy of competition—and winning—shine through in this entry from women’s pro soccer.
Second Place
Art Gentile
Bucks County Courier Times
“District tying run”
Judge’s Comments: The dirt-smeared face of the young man after scoring the tying run is a great moment.
Third Place
Tom Kelly
Daily Local News of West Chester
“Champions”
Judge’s Comments: We’ve seen lots of celebration images, but this one had the additional appeal of the tossed glove

Robert F. Fleischhauer Portrait Award
First Place
Wesley Mann
Philadelphia magazine
“Arlene Ackerman”
Judge’s Comments: The best-lighted portrait of the bunch. With plenty of dignity and empathy from and for the subject.
Second Place
Jeff Fusco
Philadelphia Business Journal
“William J. Castle”

Judge’s Comments: Dramatic, inviting. Portrait makes you want to know more about this man.

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